21 9 / 2014

"We need people in our lives with whom we can be as open as possible. To have real conversations with people may seem like such a simple, obvious suggestion, but it involves courage and risk."

21 9 / 2014

skindeeptales:

Victor Montaghini

skindeeptales:

Victor Montaghini

(via theplaintruthofit)

20 9 / 2014

circusgifs:

Tweets & Emails : Ass mode !

+ bonus

Oh, Craig!

(via theautisticavenger)

20 9 / 2014

20 9 / 2014

saatchionline.com

saatchionline.com

20 9 / 2014

In early times, the darkly glorious yew-tree was probably the only evergreen tree in Britain. Both Druids with their belief in reincarnation, and later Christians with their teaching of the resurrection, regarded it as a natural emblem of everlasting life. Its capacity for great age enriched its symbolic value. The early Irish regarded it as one of the most ancient beings on earth. Yew is the last on a list of oldest things in a passage from the fourteenth century Book of Lismore: ‘Three lifetimes of the yew for the world from its beginning to its end.’
The yew’s reputation for long life is due to the unique way in which the tree grows. Its branches grow down into the ground to form new stems, which then rise up around the old central growth as separate but linked trunks. After a time, they cannot be distinguished from the original tree. So the yew has always been a symbol of death and rebirth, the new that springs out of the old, and a fitting tree for us to study at the beginning of the new year.

In early times, the darkly glorious yew-tree was probably the only evergreen tree in Britain. Both Druids with their belief in reincarnation, and later Christians with their teaching of the resurrection, regarded it as a natural emblem of everlasting life. Its capacity for great age enriched its symbolic value. The early Irish regarded it as one of the most ancient beings on earth. Yew is the last on a list of oldest things in a passage from the fourteenth century Book of Lismore: ‘Three lifetimes of the yew for the world from its beginning to its end.’

The yew’s reputation for long life is due to the unique way in which the tree grows. Its branches grow down into the ground to form new stems, which then rise up around the old central growth as separate but linked trunks. After a time, they cannot be distinguished from the original tree. So the yew has always been a symbol of death and rebirth, the new that springs out of the old, and a fitting tree for us to study at the beginning of the new year.

20 9 / 2014

"The most fundamental aggression to ourselves, the most fundamental harm we can do to ourselves, is to remain ignorant by not having the courage and the respect to look at ourselves honestly and gently."

 Pema Chödrön, When Things Fall Apart: Heart Advice for Difficult Times (via purplebuddhaproject)

Self talk.  It always seems like there is a new lesson to learn and I have to have a conversation with myself, an honest one.

20 9 / 2014

"We think that the point is to pass the test or overcome the problem, but the truth is that things don’t really get solved. They come together and they fall apart. Then they come together again and fall apart again. It’s just like that. The healing comes from letting there be room for all of this to happen: room for grief, for relief, for misery, for joy."

 Pema Chödrön, When Things Fall Apart: Heart Advice for Difficult Times (via purplebuddhaproject)

19 9 / 2014

"Sometimes it’s hard, but really it’s just great. Most of the time it’s fun. And even when it’s not fun, it makes me a better person."

19 9 / 2014

"I love you, but I’m mad at you is one of the most freeing, important things you can say in a stable relationship. Does that make sense? To know that you have the ability and the right to be mad at someone and know that it doesn’t mean things are over, that it doesn’t mean things are irreparable. That it just means I’m mad, but God, I love you. I love you. Now leave me alone."

To be good, to save nothing  (via justgoodvibes)

It took me a while to figure this out and not freak out (see last week’s post about learning to handle people being mad at you).  It certainly helps when the other person is willing to take a step over the line and say the words or give your shoulder a little squeeze.  That reminder is comforting.

(via mostlysignssomeportents)